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Places of Change ๐Ÿ—“

September 5 to October 18, 2017

Opening Reception: September 8, 2017
6 to 8pm

 

The Pina Zangaro Gallery
2040 Oakdale Ave
San Francisco, CA 94124 (map)

Hours: Monday through Friday, 8 AM till 4:30 PM

15 BAPC members are exhibiting work inspired by changes
from neighborhoods across the SF Bay Area.

  • Rose Borden – Market Street
  • Adrienne Defendi – Albany Bulb
  • Anthony Delgado – Market Street
  • Christine Federici – Albany Bulb
  • Dan Fenstermacher – Market Street
  • Linda Fitch – Palo Alto
  • Ralph Hillebrand – Albany Bulb
  • Susan Hillyard – Mission Bay/Dogpatch
  • Ellen Konar, Steve Goldband – Redwood City
  • Tom Lavin – Oakland Estuary
  • Heather Polley– Albany Bulb
  • Angelika Schilli – Mission Bay/Dogpatch
  • Cindy Stokes – Mission Bay/Dogpatch
  • Nick Winkworth – Redwood City

 

A Point Of Transition ๐Ÿ—“

February 23 through March 5

A Group Show by members of the Bay Area Photographers Collective (BAPC), and the Alameda Photographers.

This exhibit features photographic imagery shot in several abandoned buildings on Alameda Point’s former military base which will soon be demolished as part of the area’s redevelopment plan. The Photographers were granted special access to the buildings in July 2016, giving them a unique opportunity to document a facility that is usually sealed to the public, and will soon be lost to history.

LOCATION
Faction Brewing 2501 Monarch Street, Alameda CA
http://factionbrewing.com/
Regular Viewing Hours: Wednesdays โ€“ Saturdays, Noonโ€“8pm and Sundays,
Noon to 6pm Show runs February 23 through March 5

OPENING RECEPTION
Thur., February 23, 6-8pm
(including hors d’oeuvres and no-host bar)

Vanishing Point ๐Ÿ—“

Annual BAPC Members Exhibit
August 18 – October 7, 2016

The relgious processions of Semana Santa in Seville the events and sights surrounding them.

Mullen Brothers Gallery

2040 Oakdale Ave.

San Francisco, CA 94124

www.mbisf.com

Opening Reception: Thursday, September 8th, 2016, (6pm-8pm)

Gallery Hours: Monday – Friday 8am – 4pm

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In Motion ๐Ÿ—“

In Motion Curated by Hal Fischer
January 21 – March 3, 2016

Opening Reception: Saturday, January 23, 2016, 1-4pm
Curator Hal Fischer will give a Talk about the exhibition at the reception.

Gallery Hours: Tuesday – Wednesday 4 – 9pm, Thursday 1pm – 9pm, Saturday 12 – 5pm, Sunday 12 – 6pm
Location: Harvey Milk Photography Center 50 Scott Street, San Francisco CA 94117

In Motion Postcard Front

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Upon Reflection ๐Ÿ—“

Gerdes_fleamarkets74Curated by Stephen Wirtz

December 18 โ€“ January 10, 2015

Start the holiday celebrations with the Artists Reception on Thursday, December 18, 6:00 to 8:00. The exhibit will include an Open Portfolio Night with artists presenting work on First Friday, January 2.

Exhibiting Artists:
Anthony J. Hall
Henry Bowles
Rebecca K. Chang
Adrienne Defendi
Anthony Delgado
Christine Federici
Ingeborg Gerdes
Ellen Konar and Steve Goldband
Kirk Thompson
Barbara Kyne
Eric Larson
Tom Lavin
Lee S. Nelson
Nick Winkworth
Ari Salomon

PHOTO
473 25th Street
Oakland, CA 94612

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Conversation ๐Ÿ—“

BAPCโ€™s Annual Membership Show is a special collaboration with 27 sequential images that are related visually โ€” kind of like an “exquisite corpse”.

Gerdes_tattoogirl-800
Buccis

6121 Hollis Street
Emeryville

October 4 โ€“ 31, 2014

Show Opening:
October 9, 5 – 7 PM

 

Abstractions ๐Ÿ—“

An Exhibition of the Bay Area Photographers Collective (BAPC)
Focus Gallery
December 2005

Eric Larson | Art Levit | Angelika Schilli | Kime Smith

 

Abstract photography departs significantly from representational accuracy and the illusion of recording reality of more traditional, subject-based photography. With abstracts, the photographer focuses on the relationship between shapes, lines, patterns, textures and colors, and not on the depiction of real objects, in order to express his or her vision in a symbolic way. In fact, objects are often undefined and unrecognizable.

This show is inspired by BAPC’s goal to present smaller group exhibitions in which a handful of members get the opportunity to interpret a single but multi-layered theme. The topic “abstractions” was chosen to provide a forum for members, who have explored this subject in depth, to share their individual artistic insights of a complex idea.

In this show, you will find that Art Levit is more interested in texture, pattern, color and rhythm than in the subject’s physical identity, setting, or scale. He aims to convey his own emotional resonance with the image. Eric Larson’s photographs were mostly taken while commuting between locations and explore the relationship between time and space in “still” photographs. Kime Smith’s body of work, “Etudes,” is a disciplined study of the square format, in which the creative composition of lines, shapes and forms comes into focus. Angelika Schilli searches for the light that transforms and transcends the most ordinary things.

With this work, we hope not only to express and share our ideas of abstractions, but to invite viewers to explore their own concepts of abstract photography. BAPC is a nonprofit organization committed to building a community of photographers. Our work ranges from fine art to documentary, color to black and white, traditional darkroom to digital imaging.

 

Eric Larson

Art Levit

Angelika Schilli

 

Kime Smith

All Over The Map ๐Ÿ—“

An Exhibition of the Bay Area Photographers Collective (BAPC)
September 2006

 

Most group exhibits strive to show work that unites around a single subject or theme. “All Over the Map,” in contrast, seeks to demonstrate the sweeping diversity of talent within the Collective. Some of the photographs are of places we recognize: Paris at night, rural China, the Mojave Desert. Others show us a glimpse of familiarity before the strange and imagined take over: doors opening to spectral rooms, the soft blur of faces and bodies in transit. Coming from where? Going where?

This exhibit presents an exploration of the literal to the symbolic, spanning the spectrum of photographic technology, from platinum to digital. Variety is also reflected in size as well: The smallest image is 2″ x 3,” the largest, 24″ x 55.” Abstracts, close-ups, travel, documentary, interiors, urbanscapes, these images roam the territory between the delicate and intimate and the bold and expansive.

When we want to know where we are headed, we use a map. The images in this show represent landmarks along the individual routes our members have taken.

Bill McClaren


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Lester Weiss


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Adrienne Defendi


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Charlotte Niel


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Anita White


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Kime Smith


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Rebecca Chang


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Art Levit


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Donna Levrault


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Charlotte Kay


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Heather Polley


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Ari Salomon


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Tom De Carlo


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Beth Kientzle


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John Bergholm


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Angelika Schilli


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Jan Potts


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Deborah D. Lattimore


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Gloria Upchurch


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Eric Larson


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Kirk Thompson


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Landscape Revisited ๐Ÿ—“

An Exhibition of the Bay Area Photographers Collective (BAPC)
November 4โ€”November 18, 2007

Landscape Revisited: Challenging the Traditional Approach to Landscape. A BAPC Members’ Exhibition. Reception: Saturday, November 10, 5-8pm. Mendocino Art Center’s Main Gallery

 

 

 
Rebecca Chang



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Tom De Carlo



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Adrienne Defendi



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Alan George



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Beth Kientzle



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Eric Larson



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Deborah D. Lattimore



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Tom Lavin



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Art Levit



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Donna Levreault



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Erin Malone



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Charlotte Niel  
 
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Heather Polley



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Ari Salomon



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Angelika Schilli



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Kay Taneyhill



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Kirk Thompson  
 
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Gloria Upchurch



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Show Statement

From the invention of photography more than 175 years ago, the landscape has played a pivotal role. The remarkable 19th century landscapes of William Henry Jackson and Carlton Watkins shaped their contemporaries’ view of the land, but at the time were not considered art. In 1902, Stylists and Photo Secessionists seeking photography’s recognition as a respectable art form moved from the straight landscape of 19th century “to advance photography as applied to pictorial expression” with a clearly painterly artifice evident in their work.

A little more than 20 years later, Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, Edward Weston, and others rejected the secessionist view and formed f 64, linking back to the traditions of Watkins and Jackson, with a new manifesto:

Striving to define photography as an art form by simple and direct presentation through purely photographic methods… possessing no qualities of technique, composition or idea, derivative of any other art form.

The 60s and 70s moved the landscape into the realm of the vernacular, poking fun at the strict formalism and perceived pictorialism of Adams and other western landscape photographers. In the last 30 years, the landscape has been visited, revisited and remade in every imaginable way. With the advent of digital technology and new ways of creating, using, transmitting, and sharing images, the landscape is again turned on its head.

Given this heritage, we members of BAPC challenged ourselves to examine the landscape and to individually define what it means. One member reveals “a sense of something unexpected but not entirely unfamiliar” with images concentrating “on details of the landscape that can change your perception of landscape itself.” Another explores a “domestic landscape of daily existence.” For one, “Air, Water and Earth” become the constituent elements of the landscape. Another sees the “intersection between the landscape and the body.”

Several explore the vernacular landscape. For one, “what we are told or witness does not neatly sync with our own perceptions and realities,” while another sees the “entropic nature of the engineered landscape.”

Members explored pictorial traditions with 19th, 20th and 21st century techniques, applying Cyanotype, Pinhole, Holga, Polaroid, digital panorama, and High Dynamic Range (HDR) digital to solve the landscape puzzle.

Ultimately in each of our personal and individual expressions, the Landscape Revisited serves as the Bay Area Photography Collective’s homage to the rich tradition of the Landscape in the history of photography.

Whimsy ๐Ÿ—“

An Exhibition of the Bay Area Photographers Collective (BAPC)
March 20โ€”April 20, 2008

Whimsy:
A BAPC group exhibition addressing the lighter side of photography.
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Reception: Thursday, March 20 2008
Rayko Photo Center Gallery

 

 

 
Tom De Carlo

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Adrienne Defendi
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Alan George

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Beth Kientzle

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Eric Larson
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Tom Lavin
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Erin Malone
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Charlotte Niel
 
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Ari Salomon

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Angelika Schilli
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Kirk Thompson
 
 
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Show Statement

Whimsy Whim”sey, Whimsey, n.; pl. Whimseys or
Whimsies. [See Whim.]
1. A whim; a freak; a capricious notion, a fanciful or odd conceit. “The whimsies of poets and painters.” –Ray.

Men’s folly, whimsies, and inconstancy. –Swift.

Mistaking the whimseys of a feverish brain for the calm revelation of truth. –Bancroft.

2: The trait of acting unpredictably and more from whim or caprice than from reason or judgment; “I despair at the flightiness and whimsicality of my memory”
Etymology — whimร -wham (hwim_hwam_, wim_wam_)
noun
1. a fanciful ornament; bauble; trinket
2. an odd notion; fancy; whim

Ask someone the meaning of whimsy and the answer you will most likely get is humorous, funny or lighthearted. Google “Whimsy and Art,” and you will find images that can best be described as fanciful, cute or more likely kitschy.

However the word represents a more nuanced, quirky and maybe even a bit darker definition than one finds at these fanciful sites. Words such as folly, caprice, freakish do not necessarily conjure up such light notions. Common synonyms include: anomaly, apparition, caprice, conceit, crank, deviancy, dottiness, eccentricity, flimflam, freakish, idiosyncrasy, illusion, kink, oddity, peculiarity, queerness, quirkiness, unconventionality.

With that more nuanced definition of “whimsy” in mind, members of the Bay Area Photographers Collective explore found and created whimsy in photographs. While the themes, approach and results of the work vary greatly, all do justice to a more complete definition of the word. The work is probably best summed up in the words of one of the exhibiting artists:

“The momentary glimpse of something slightly humorous, ironic or simply out of place… a brief half thought about some odd scene or object and then just as quickly forgotten.”

Loss ๐Ÿ—“

A BAPC group exhibition of photographs dealing with different aspects of loss.

This show is dedicated to Jill Berk Jiminez, Executive Director, Berkeley Art Center, who passed away unexpectedly on October 17th. Her loss will be felt. Tom De Carlo Beth Kientzle Eric Larson Thomas Lavin Erin Malone Charlotte Niel Heather Polley Angelika Schilli Kirk Thompson

November 2 โ€“ December 7, 2008
Opening reception:  Sunday, November 2, 2pmโ€“4pm
Artists’ Talk: Wednesday, November 12, 7pmโ€“9pm

The exhibition will include an interactive war memorial “dedicated to the men and women who gave all they had to give.”

Visitors are encouraged to bring an offering: “Flowers in the name of a deceased war veteran will be appreciated and cared for.”

Berkeley Art Center, 1275 Walnut Street, Berkeley. Open to the public. Gallery hours: Wednesdayโ€“Sunday, 12 noonโ€“5pm, closed Mondayโ€“Tuesday.

PRESS
Review in Art slant

 

Tom De Carlo

 

beth kientzle

eric larson

tom lavin

erin malone

 

charlotte niel

heather polley

 

angelika schilli

 

kirk thompson

One Shot x2 (2009) ๐Ÿ—“

Harvey Milk Photographic Center, San Francisco. September 2009