Reconsidering the Horizon

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Curated by Renny Pritikin

Exhibiting artists:
Jack Androvich
Adrienne Defendi
Anthony Delgado
Steve Epstein
Steve Goldband & Ellen Konar
Irene Imfeld
Thomas Lavin
Erin Malone
Heather Polley
Ari Salomon
Gary Weiner

Artist’s Reception
Saturday July 20, 2013
2pm to 5pm

Curator’s Talk
Saturday July 20, 2013
3pm

A BAPC group exhibition at PHOTO, 473 25th Street, Oakland, CA 94612

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Review of Walker Evans at Stanford

I went with a group of Internet photo friends to the Walker Evans show at Stanford on Saturday. Richard Gordon asked me to send a note if the prints in the show were good ones. Here’s an ambivalent answer.

If you’re a disciple or devotee, every Walker Evans show is a good one just because you see some prints again. If you’re an aficionado but more critical – or are less devoted – the Stanford show might seem like ho-hum, more-of-the-same. One nice thing is its scale: It’s the (younger) Fisher family’s collection of Evans’ work, and it seems to have been collected by saying ‘Jeffrey, we’ll take everything you can lay your hands on.’ They don’t seem to have a special collecting eye, they just reach out for one of everything. They’ve missed a few I always want to see again (the watermelon boy, Richard Perkins Contractor, Cherokee Parts Store), but they’ve caught a few I hadn’t seen before or had ignored, including a head-on version of the post office in Sprott, Alabama, with a porch-full of patrons and loungers.

Walker Evans, Broadway, 1930. Gelatin silver print.  Lent by Elizabeth and Robert J. Fisher, MBA ’80. © Walker Evans Archive, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Walker Evans, Broadway, 1930. Gelatin silver print. Lent by Elizabeth and Robert J. Fisher, MBA ’80. © Walker Evans Archive, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

The subway series is well represented in dark prints. Maybe Evans wanted them that way, but I don’t remember seeing them so dark and haven’t seen them reproduced that way. Anyhow the printing accentuates the darkly underground feel.

On Richard’s question of how these particular prints look, the answer is complicated because a wall-sign says they’re prints he made or approved/supervised, but the title cards don’t say which are which & I couldn’t tell which he made and which were by Thomas Brown or Jerry Thompson. Evans wasn’t a consistent printer – maybe he liked them all when he printed them, or maybe he kept some that could have been thrown away. Some, like the famous BW man in Havana, are great, with lovely highlight detail. But you can see he didn’t always care too much: the particular print of the striped New Orleans lady barber that he reproduced in American Photographs was so weakly fixed that now it’s light brown.

I enjoyed the copies of post-war Fortune magazines with his work, but the accompanying text baffled/horrified me. A wall-note said he made ten thousand color transparencies for Fortune – I had no idea there were so many. But the note also said neither he nor the magazine arranged for photo-printing, and so the only versions we have are the aging magazines; no dye transfers or Cibachromes. Because it’s hard to imagine that they exist and nobody has located and reproduced them, I suppose Fortune cleaned out its archives and destroyed its photo-fortune?

What I enjoyed most was seeing finely detailed prints that were small. I’ve fallen in too heavily with the trend toward large prints, and I was re-awakened to the pleasure of exquisite prints that compel the eye to enter them and search search search for the tiniest details: What tiny highlights! And what does that little sign on the wall say? It’s a trip I’ve been missing lately.

Kirk Thompson

Timescapes exhibition

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When She Was Young, Charlotte Niel

A photography exhibit featuring work by members of the Bay Area Photographers Collective at Collaborate Studio & Art Gallery in Oakland.

Participating artists are:
Adrienne Defendi
Linda Fitch
Barbara Kyne
Eric Larson
Erin Malone
John Martin
Charlotte Niel

The show will run from December 2, 2011 – January 25, 2012.
Curated by Susan Rippberger and Nicole Hills, both of Collaborate.

Artists Reception December 2nd, 6-9pm

Hours: Tuesday – Friday 11:00 AM to 5:30 PM

Collaborate Studio & Art Gallery
431 13th Street
Oakland, CA 94612
Located in City Center Oakland, at 13th and Broadway, steps from the 12th Street BART Station.

HMC Photo Exhibition

Our friends at the Harvey Milk Photo Center are hosting an exhibition of current instructors at the Photo Center.

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Opening Reception
Friday April, 15 2011
6:30 PM – 9:00 PM

Come see this new exhibition by world traveled photographers and current instructors teaching classes at the Harvey Milk Photo Center.

Harvey Milk Photo Center
50 Scott Street
San Francisco, CA 94117

Gallery Hours:
Tuesday – Thursday: 6:00 – 9:00
Saturday: 10:00 – 4:30

Exhibition closes Wednesday May, 11 2011

BAPC: Bay Area Street Photography Now

Most artists are doing basically the same thing – staying off the streets.
— Edward Ruscha

This show, inspired in part by the book and online project Street Photography Now, is an exploration of this topic by six members of our collective. The photographers use a broad spectrum of photographic technology—from silver gelatin to digital cameraphones—to candidly portray life in public places. Their vision elevates the ordinary into realms of beauty and myth.

Artists’ Reception Friday, April 1 6 – 9pm
Exhibiting Artists: Anthony Delgado, Ralf Hillebrand, Thomas Lavin, Charlotte Niel, Kirk Thompson, Gary Weiner

PHOTO 473 25th Street Oakland, CA 94612
510.407.0449 www.photogalleryoakland.com
Hours: Thursday through Saturday, 12p.m. to 6 p.m.

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BAPC: Cultivating Photography

BAPC members will exhibit in the Skylight Gallery at Arc Studios and Gallery.

Opening Reception March 5th, 7-10PM
1246 Folsom Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

Exhibiting artists include:
Adrienne Defendi, Anthony Delgado, Charlotte Niel, Erin Malone, Gary Weiner, Heather Polley, Irene Imfeld, Kirk Thompson, Linda Fitch, Sophia Antipas, Thomas Lavin

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PhotoAlliance Summer Workshop

VISUAL STORYTELLING: A WORKSHOP WITH JASON HOUSTON

Featuring: Jason Houston

Spend an intensive three days/four nights focused on learning how to take control of your camera and make the photographs you set out to make. Using the structure of an editorial-styled assignment, we’ll work on conceiving and planning images, refining your approach and focusing your personal vision, and of course all the technical skills needed to pull it off. A project-based, hands-on format will include lots of photographing, editing, critique, and finally presenting your work. This workshop is designed to accommodate a wide range of styles and abilities.

via PhotoAlliance.

Ari Salomon's Motion Studies at SFMoMA's window gallery

Member Ari Salomon was featured in an article in the SF Examiner SF-Photography Blog.

Some photographers, and Ari Salomon is among these, skirt the artificial distinction between subjective and objective uses of photography by concentrating on camera vision. Cameras can see things that human eyes cannot.

via Camera vision in the alley – Ari Salomon’s Motion Studies at SFMoMA’s window gallery.

Larry Sultan, California Photographer, Dies at 63 – Obituary (Obit) – NYTimes.com

Larry Sultan, California Photographer, Dies at 63

Larry Sultan, a highly influential California photographer whose 1977 collaboration, “Evidence” — a book made up solely of pictures culled from vast industrial and government archives — became a watershed in the history of art photography, died on Sunday at his home in Greenbrae, Calif. He was 63.

via Larry Sultan, California Photographer, Dies at 63 – Obituary (Obit) – NYTimes.com.

Root Division Holiday Sale

CALL FOR ARTISTS: THE UNDER 100 ‘H’ SALE
Date: Saturday, December 13, 2009, 7:00pm – 10:00pm

Join a select group of artisans and artists for a one-night-only sale.

Last year’s sale featured 40 vendors including prints, photos & drawings, as well as handmade bags, jewelry, and other artist-made items, and we hosted over 300 people.

Final deadline to participate is November 26th.

Artisans: Fee is $50 for 4 linear feet of table space. Table space is for those selling items other than art that can be hung on the wall.

Artists: You will receive 4 linear feet of wall space in which to hang your work. Root Division will collect 40% of sales. 60% will be yours to keep.

via Root Division Events.